Category Archives: Regulation by market forces

Government Regulators are Monopolies

Here is the third article in a series on regulation I have been publishing at FEE: “Government Regulators are Monopolies.” It is part of a project to challenge the validity of government “regulation,” which should more properly be called government “restriction,” as that word describes what government agencies mostly do: they restrict people’s freedom to make voluntary exchanges. The aimContinue Reading

Government Regulators are Themselves Unregulated; That’s a Problem

Here’s a delayed posting of a link to a second article in The Freeman online about regulation. The first, “There Is No Such Thing as an Unregulated Market,” made the point that “If a market is free, it is closely regulated by the free choices of market participants.” This means that “Government regulation is not the only kind ofContinue Reading

Make Parents Responsible for Schools

Here’s a recent letter to the Baltimore Sun: May 11, 2016 Editor, the Baltimore Sun Dear Editor, Kurt Schmoke, Matt Gallagher and Tom Wilcox ask “Who’s responsible for city schools?” (Commentary, May 9, 2016). The broad answer to that question is also the fundamental reason why our city schools stay mediocre to poor, decade afterContinue Reading

Government, Stop Trying To Help Uber

Here is a letter to the editor of the Baltimore Sun, published at FEE’s Anything Peaceful and by the Sun yesterday (the online version somehow dropped the first paragraphs): An open letter to State Senator Bill Ferguson and Delegate Kathy Szeliga: Thank you for your commentary, “Give ridesharing a home in Maryland,” (Baltimore Sun, April 3). While it is gratifyingContinue Reading

“There’s No Such Thing as an Unregulated Market”

That’s the title of my piece just published in The Freeman online. The subtitle: “It’s a choice between regulation by legislators or by consumers.” Here’s a slice: We want the aims of regulation — regularity and predictability in markets, decent quality and reasonable prices for the goods and services we buy — and thinking thatContinue Reading

The Coolest Thing About Uber

A letter I wrote the Wall Street Journal recently, criticizing the authoritarian flavor of one of its columns, was picked up by The Freeman. A slice: Here’s what it takes to make Uber a success, apparently: Enter new markets without asking regulators for permission, then build enough of a customer base to make classifying the service asContinue Reading

Uber Against Racial Profiling

In my latest article in The Freeman, I look at another instance of the superiority of regulation by market forces to regulation by government. A slice: Uber is regulated by market forces, and market forces regulate far more effectively than the DC taxi commission does. Uber gets a cut of every fare, so the more fares it arranges, theContinue Reading

How Free-Market Internet Will Protect the Little Guy

An earlier post gave a rights-based reason to oppose “Net Neutrality”: Internet service providers own their fiber optic cables, switches, and so on, the physical infrastructure of the Internet. It’s their property. Their rights to their own should be respected. Not everyone is persuaded by rights-based reasoning. Dan H., for example, discussing the post onContinue Reading

Regulation of Lodging by the Market Process

Does the lodging industry—hotels and such—need government regulation? I don’t think so, and I’m more convinced than before after listening yesterday to a fascinating EconTalk conversation (http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2014/09/nathan_blecharc.html) between host Russ Roberts and Nathan Blecharczyck, a founder of the lodging service AirBnB. Blecharczyck explains that every AirBnB customer rates every property in which she stays, forContinue Reading

Unregulated By Government Doesn’t Mean Unregulated

Many people believe that markets must be either regulated by government or unregulated. They believe that if we don’t want markets out of control, lacking in regularity, predictability, and quality control, we have to let governments regulate them. But that’s false, because markets forces regulate markets. The actions of every market participant constrain and influence theContinue Reading

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