Central Planning Does Not Work for Schooling, Either

Here is the opening of a recent post at Learn Liberty’s blog:

In Kentucky, says scholar Caleb Brown, it’s easy to find a barista who has a bachelor’s degree, but manufacturing companies can’t find the machinists they desperately need — whose pay would start at $60,000–$80,000 a year.

That slice of modern economic life comes from Brown’s Cato Cato Daily podcast conversation with Jim Stergios of Massachusetts’s Pioneer Institute. Listening to it, I realized a problem with government schooling I had never zeroed in on before. In criticizing government schooling, I have focused on the failure of government schools to provide as high quality instruction as they would if they had to compete for students in a free market for education. But Brown and Stergios opened my eyes to another problem: government school systems fail to provide different kinds of instruction as appropriate to different kinds of students in different places and times.

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Email

Leave a reply

availableonamazon
Contact Dr. Baetjer

Enter your email address:

Skip to toolbar